[ StackOverflow ] – Use ListForEach to add element to HashTable

c# – Use ListForEach to add element to HashTable – Stack Overflow

Try this:

valueList.ForEach(x => htable.Add(valueList.FindIndex(y => y == x), x));

Although, there’s really no reason not to use a for here

for(var index =0; index < valueList.Count; index++){
    htable.Add(index, valueList[index]);}
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[ StackOverflow ] – Know if an attribute contains a value in HTMLAgilityPack’s C# Node Collection

xml – What is the correct XPath for choosing attributes that contain “foo”? – Stack Overflow

The link above is quite interesting for HTMLAgilityPack C# beginners, helps a lot !

Another thing to note is that while the XPath above will return the correct answer for that particular xml, if you want to guarantee you only get the “a” elements in element “blah”, you should as others have mentioned also use

/bla/a[contains(@prop,'Foo')]

This will search you all “a” elements in your entire xml document, regardless of being nested in a “blah” element

//a[contains(@prop,'Foo')]

[ Microsoft’s MSDN ] – Recommended Tags for Documentation Comments

Recommended Tags for Documentation Comments (C# Programming Guide)

The C# compiler processes documentation comments in your code and formats them as XML in a file whose name you specify in the /doc command-line option. To create the final documentation based on the compiler-generated file, you can create a custom tool, or use a tool such as Sandcastle.

Here are some Recommended Tags for Documentation Comments

<c>

<para>

<see>*

<code>

<param>*

<seealso>*

<example>

<paramref>

<summary>

<exception>*

<permission>*

<typeparam>*

<include>*

<remarks>

<typeparamref>

<list>

<returns>

<value>

[ Microsoft’s MSDN ] The Summary Tag in C#

(C# Programming Guide)

The <summary> tag should be used to describe a type or a type member. Use <remarks> to add supplemental information to a type description. Use the cref Attribute to enable documentation tools such as Sandcastle to create internal hyperlinks to documentation pages for code elements.

The text for the <summary> tag is the only source of information about the type in IntelliSense, and is also displayed in the Object Browser Window.

Compile with /doc to process documentation comments to a file. To create the final documentation based on the compiler-generated file, you can create a custom tool, or use a tool such as Sandcastle.

[ Stack Overflow ] c# – What is the difference between explicit and implicit type casts?

c# – What is the difference between explicit and implicit type casts? – Stack Overflow

What is the difference between explicit and implicit type casts?

What’s the difference between the President of the United States and the President of Canada?

Since there is no President of Canada, it’s hard to answer the question. The right thing to do is to push back and ask for clarification of the question. By “the President of Canada”, does the questioner mean the Queen (ceremonial head of state), the Governor General (who can veto bills) or the Prime Minister (who effectively acts as the executive), or something else? Hard to say without clarification.

And even with clarification, it’s a vague question. What differences do you want to know about?

Since there is no such thing as an “implicit cast” in C# it is hard to answer your question. In C#, casting is an operator. So I’ll push back on it.

Did you mean to ask “what’s the difference between an explicit conversion and an implicit conversion?” Or did you mean to ask about the semantics of the cast operator? Or the difference between the cast operator and other type conversion operators? Or situations in which cast operators can be “implicitly” inserted into your code by the compiler? (For example, the foreach loop and the += operator can both implicitly insert an invisible cast.)